'I’ll get rid of these pains that I have....' - Elina Svitolina on her injuries after dominating against 23rd-seeded Anna Kalinskaya in Italian Open 2024

Former world No. 3 Elina Svitolina is set for a riveting round-of-16 clash against Aryna Sabalenka in the Italian Open 2024 after dominating against 23rd-seeded Anna Kalinskaya.

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Pratyusha Bhawar
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Elina Svitolina (Source - Twitter)

Elina Svitolina (Source - Twitter)

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Former world No. 3 Elina Svitolina is set for a riveting round-of-16 clash against Aryna Sabalenka in the Italian Open 2024 after dominating against 23rd-seeded Anna Kalinskaya. This year's Australian Open quarterfinalist, Kalinskaya, who also played in a WTA 1000 tournament in Dubai, suffered a 6-3 loss on Sunday night to No. 16 seed Svitolina. Speaking about the game here, it was clear going into the match that Kalinskaya wouldn't be a daunting opponent for Svitolina, as the Ukrainian easily won in just one hour and 13 minutes of action.

However, Elina has recently opened up about her struggling career due to injuries after the win at Rome. The 29-year-old star has admitted that she has been going through terrible things due to her injuries. In addition, the Ukrainian-born player revealed that she has been doing a lot of exercises and a lot of other things to keep herself very strong.

Meanwhile, Svitolina has also talked about how she has improved her game and overcome the struggles to reach the pinnacle of the level.

I think for a lot of players it’s like this, where you continue playing: Elina Svitolina

“I’m struggling on a daily basis. Maybe not 10/10 pain but two, three, and sometimes more depending on the matches and the intensity of the training. I feel almost like I'm 17 again coming on the tour fresh. Every day is a new day where I can hopefully feel better with exercise and treatment to get stronger. Hopefully, in the future, I’ll get rid of these pains that I have. But for me, it’s difficult not to play or to take a longer time off, and I think for a lot of players it’s like this, where you continue playing," said Elina Svitolina.

“I always was looking to improve my serve, to improve the power on my shots, to strike the ball cleaner, some technical things on my forehand. Now I had time. I had three months starting from January until my first match where we were working on my game," she said last summer.

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