French Open 2024: Here's how Carlos Alcaraz paved his way to the Finals

Carlos Alcaraz thrashed Jannik Sinner 2-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3 on Friday to advance to his first French Open final and become the youngest player ever to reach a Grand Slam title match on three different surfaces.

author-image
Pratyusha Bhawar
New Update
Carlos Alcaraz (Source - Twitter)
Listen to this article
0.75x 1x 1.5x
00:00 / 00:00

World number three Carlos Alcaraz thrashed Jannik Sinner 2-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3 on Friday to advance to his first French Open final and become the youngest player ever to reach a Grand Slam title match on three different surfaces. Alcaraz won the 2022 U.S. Open on hard courts and the 2023 Wimbledon Open on grass courts and is scheduled to play for the title on Roland Garros' red clay against Alexander Zverev on June 9.

Speaking of the game here, Sinner took a 2-0 lead in the second set and held a break before resolving a few injuries that needed many trips from a trainer. Sinner then won two sets to one. Alcaraz, however, never faltered and often used his huge forehand and drop shots to gradually regain control. He did this to win games outright, to set up curving kicks, and even to create room for smart passing shots.

After winning the Australian Open in January, Sinner had a 13-0 record going into the semifinals of the 2024 Grand Slam. Despite losing on Friday, he will make history next week by climbing to the top of the ATP rankings.

That's the key even more on clay, here at Roland Garros: Carlos Alcaraz

This will be the first French Open men's final without Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer, or Rafael Nadal. After breaking the meniscus in his right knee and undergoing surgery this week, Djokovic, the defending champion in Paris, withdrew before the quarterfinals. Sinner will go up from No. 2 in the ATP rankings despite his loss on Friday, as he is no longer ranked No. 1 due to his failure to return to the final.

"You have to find the joy (while) suffering. That's the key even more on clay, here at Roland Garros. Long rallies. Four-hour matches. Five sets, Alcaraz said. You have to fight. You have to suffer. But as I told my team many, many times, you have to enjoy suffering."

Carlos Alcaraz