NBA has reached an agreement for a new media rights contract: Reports

Basketball: NBA has reached an agreement on its new media package, an 11-year pact worth $76 billion that ensures player wages will continue to rise.

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Varun Sarwate
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NBA has reached an agreement on its new media package, an 11-year pact worth $76 billion that ensures player wages will continue to rise for the foreseeable future and will undoubtedly affect how some spectators access the game in the coming years. 

The deal, which was unprecedented in the NBA in terms of duration and total value, goes into effect for the 2025–26 campaign. While certain games will now stream on NBC and Amazon Prime, others will still show on ESPN and ABC. Though it may be leaving the league, TNT Sports, which has been a part of the broadcasting family since the 1980s, still has five days to accept one of the proposals.

ESPN and ABC will continue to air the league's top package, which includes the NBA Finals and one of the conference championship series. ABC has broadcast the NBA Finals since 2003. When the NFL's regular season concludes, ABC will continue to broadcast games on Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons.

ESPN's major evenings would remain Wednesday, with occasional Friday and Sunday games. The return of NBC, which aired NBA games from 1990 to 2002, provided the league with two broadcast network partners for the first time.

The deal would raise the salary cap

In the short term, the deal most likely means that the league would raise the salary cap by 10% annually, which is the highest amount permitted under the terms of the most recent Collective Bargaining deal between the NBA and its players. That suggests that players like Shai Gilgeous-Alexander of Oklahoma City and Luka Doncic of Dallas might earn around $80 million in the 2030–31 season, increasing the possibility that elite players would make nearly to $100 million a season by the mid–2030s.

Commissioner Adam Silver has been very clear about the order of his top agenda items in recent seasons: preserving labor peace (which was achieved with the new CBA), negotiating a new media deal (which is now essentially complete), and then, only then, would the league turn its attention to adding new franchises. Las Vegas and Seattle are frequently considered major expansion contenders, with Montreal, Vancouver, and Kansas City all anticipated to attract groupings of interested parties.

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